NeuroPunch

What Small Biz can Learn from Big Brand Super Bowl Ads

Image: MightyBoyBrian on Flickr

Super Bowl XLVI was the most watched television broadcast ever - estimated at 111.3 million people.

Did you know the Super Bowl ended in a tie? According to Marketing Land, out of the 59 Super Bowl commercials, there were 8 Facebook mentions and 8 Twitter mentions

As the game ended, Twitter counted 12,233 posts per second, the most for any English language event in the six-year history of Twitter.

So, how did the big brands fail? Simple. They didn’t give the viewer a good reason to continue the conversation online. Simply adding a Twitter hashtag or Facebook icon/URL at the end of an ad is not enough. Big brands paid big budgets to gain the attention of 111.3 million people and then left them hanging. It’s going to cost them a lot of money to regain that attention in the future. To make matters worse, a lot of the brands that showed Twitter hashtags in their commercials were not actively engaging with tweeters online (#wasteofmoney).

Whatever you do as a small business, always keep the conversation going (Gary Vaynerchuk is a big advocate of this).

Be sure to subscribe so you can read my next post: How your Small Biz will Win with Twitter.

Top 5 Most Compelling Social Media Stats for Small Biz

5) 1 out of 5 social network users is likely to visit another social site after leaving one.

4) There are now more than 800 million active Facebook users, with over 200 million added in 2011.

3) More than half of Facebook users log in every day - that’s more than 400 million people.

2) Americans spend more time on Facebook than any other U.S. website.

1) Nearly 23% of online time is spent on social networks.

**BONUS: Small businesses don’t have to spend much to get results.  Zoomerang found that nearly 60% of all small business decision-makers spend less than $100 on social media and 74% of businesses don’t employ anyone to manage their social media marketing.

Source: Read 20 more stats on SocialMediaExaminer.com